Kampen Park

Parks and open spaces are an integral part of the landscape of Oslo. The various parks and open spaces are interconnected by paths so that the city’s inhabitants can walk between them.

As the city expanded in the middle of the 19th century, areas were appropriated for parks and recreational purposes. The eastern part of the city (Østkanten) was prioritized due to congestion and industrialization. The residential and more affluent western parts of the city (Majorstuen, Frogner) have comparably fewer parks and open spaces. 95% of the city’s inhabitants have a park or an open green space within 300 meters of their home.

www.myoslonorway.com

Christiania (Oslo) grew faster than most European cities around 1870–1890. Property developers built houses and villas while the city provided roads, water and sanitation. Owing to fire regulations the building material was brick, and this is largely the area that today is inside Ring 2 (the bypass road 2). Several new parks were created, most of them in the eastern part of the city. The argument giving priority to the eastern part was that it was the most crowded part of the city and was thus most in need of parks.

www.myoslonorway.com

The city’s expansion and the creation of a tram network contributed to increased commuting. Combined with steadily reduced working hours, this created a need to fill the available leisure time with activities. Some of the parks, like Kampen park, were used extensively from the time they were ready. The city’s park organisation from 1875, Christiania beplantningsvesen, was a new authority for creating and maintaining parks.

www.myoslonorway.com
www.myoslonorway.com
www.myoslonorway.com
www.myoslonorway.com
www.myoslonorway.com
www.myoslonorway.com
www.myoslonorway.com

Text source: Wikipedia – Photos: My Oslo Norway

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.